EDCI 339

Updated Blog Post #1

Prompt: Individual blog post #1: How can teachers effectively build relationships by encouraging safe communication and interactions in K-12 online & open learning spaces? What did you already know, what do you know now based on the course readings and activities, what do you hope to learn?

Link to Original Blog Post #1.

Link to Google Docs with revisions.

Updated & Revised Blog Post #1

As a future educator, it is key to set up the platform in a meaningful way, especially when you are building an online learning environment. This is important because in order to create a safe, collaborative, and inclusive space for all students guidelines must be well communicated to students. The purpose of an online learning space is to have students interact, collaborate, and share ideas with their peers in a positive manner. To set up an online platform with students, the teacher would need to set up guidelines with students to foster good etiquette online. This would include a class discussion about positive comments, supportive and constructive feedback, and showing respect to peers. Another resource, that would engage students in learning guidelines would be the use of a Kahoot. Alongside this discussion, the teacher would also have to go over privacy concerns online. In this course, I found going over FIPPA, as well as reading Whiteside & Garrett Dikkers (2015), was a great introduction and was needed for all students to fully understand the gravity of being in an online platform. Whiteside & Garrett Dikkers (2015) mentions the importance of “social presence is an essential literacy for cultivating emotions and relationships that enhance the overall learning experience.” After discussing those essential topics before jumping into an online space with students, one would also have to encourage students to connect with each other. By doing this the teacher would create assignments for students to work through, and they would focus directly on creating and building those relationships with their peers. This blog post, even though it is US based, still holds true for beginning online and open learning with students.

To implement open learning online, a teacher would model what good etiquette online would look like, to show students what the expectations are in that space. I found this blog regarding online blogs to be very informative for teachers to set up with students, and it takes the guesswork out of it. Blogs are such an important learning tool for open learning, because the criteria from the teacher is very broad, and it lets the student focus on what interests them. Like in this course, the use of blogs is vital, and works seamlessly to promote open and distributed learning!

The Col framework isn’t a new concept for me, but having it laid out so clearly with the ideas illustrated made it easy for me to comprehend. I never realized that it was a concept, I just kind of had the same ideas regarding online learning. I believe that this is a great resource for all educators to explore, because it really gets across what makes a safe learning space functional for all learners. The problem that educators can come across if open learning isn’t implemented properly is how to structure it for success. This diagram below shows how to include technology in open learning in a meaningful way, focusing on moving toward redefinition.

I believe that online learning is a great tool to enhance and promote learning in a different space, but it should be used alongside in class instruction. After reading the article, Regan and Jesse (2019), it solidified the importance of parental concerns when it comes to learning in an online space. The safety of each and every student is always at the forefront of each educator. However, this article highlighted why parental concerns are always valid and need to be answered fully to ease any stress the parents might have about an online learning space. Alongside open learning, it was brought to my attention that students with exceptionalities might struggle with online platforms. I see how it could be a challenge for some students, but I believe that since open learning is so open it leaves room for adaptions to be made! Some of those adaptions can include google talk to text software, having a support like an EA or parent assist with their learning online, and using an iPad with different adaptions for the student to be successful in their learning process. A Sketchnote below to show my ever evolving learning.

Sketchnote I created to show how my learning progressed over the course.

References:

CoI Framework | CoI. (2020). Retrieved 9 July 2020, from https://coi.athabascau.ca/coi-model/

Garrett Dickers, A. (2018) Social Interaction in K-12 Online Learning. In R. Ferdig & K. Kennedy (Eds.), Handbook of research on K-12 online and blended learning (pp. 509-522 ). Pittsburgh, PA: Carnegie Mellon University ETC Press.

How to speech-to-text in Google Docs. (2020). Retrieved 27 July 2020, from https://www.techrepublic.com/article/pro-tip-how-to-speech-to-text-in-google-docs/ 

Regan, P., & Jesse, J. (2019). Ethical challenges of edtech, big data and personalized learning: Twenty-first century student sorting and tracking. Ethics and Information Technology, 21(3), 167-179. DOI: 10.1007/s10676-018-9492-2

(2020). Retrieved 9 July 2020, from https://www.wix.com/blog/2020/05/teaching-online-ideas

(2020). Retrieved 27 July 2020, from https://www.oipc.bc.ca/guidance-documents/1466 

(2020). Retrieved 27 July 2020, from https://kahoot.com 

(2020). Retrieved 27 July 2020, from https://www.usnews.com/education/online-learning-lessons/articles/2017-07-28/9-common-types-of-assignments-in-online-courses 

EDCI 339

Week 4: Twitter Chat #edci339

In this video I explain why I chose this activity, the connection to the course and outside resources, and what I learned from completing the activity.

I also found this website helpful at depicting professional digital identity. 

Please check out the Twitter Chat here: https://wakelet.com/wake/CQu3tJQW60YzfKD4D_r6S 

References:

elearn Magazine: How important is Twitter in your Personal Learning Network?. (2020). Retrieved 22 July 2020, from https://elearnmag.acm.org/archive.cfm?aid=2379624 

Managing a professional digital identity: A challenge for connected professionals. (2020). Retrieved 22 July 2020, from https://www.linkinglearning.com.au/managing-a-professional-digital-identity-a-challenge-for-connected-professionals/ 

EDCI 339

Response to Erin Fletcher’s Blog Post #3

After reading over Erin Fletcher’s blog post #3: How can you ensure equitable access to authentic, meaningful & relevant learning environments for all learners in K-12 open and distributed learning contexts? I had some reflections, ideas, and suggestions myself that I would like to share below.

I think it is an important point to raise about making learning meaningful for each student, and how great it is that you are already thinking about it! The heavy questions you posed and decided to tackle are so relevant. I applaud your courage in leaning into them and not shying away from them. I might add some more resources to strengthen some ideas you began to discuss. Also by adding the 2 by 10 framework it is a good suggestion, but maybe you could have a resource to back up that idea. Using the UDL framework to check in on yourself as a teacher is a way to measure how well you are contributing to open and distributed learning. I think I would highlight the fact that it is entirely dependant on the students and their needs, so building relationships with the students is the most important thing. I LOVED how you included a sketchnote, that is such a great way to explain your understanding and show your learning! Lastly, bringing up COVID-19 and how challenging that was for not only teachers, but students to is important to recognize. If you could talk to a teacher in your community about how they dealt with the quick transition from face to face learning to online, I think that would be a welcomed addition! I loved having the opportunity to read over your ideas, and I think your understanding of this topic shines through with your blog. Great work Erin!

EDCI 339

Response to Ariana Kelly’s Blog Post #3

After reading over Ariana Kelly’s blog post #3: How can you ensure equitable access to authentic, meaningful & relevant learning environments for all learners in K-12 open and distributed learning contexts? I had some reflections, ideas, and suggestions that I would like to share below.

In your opening paragraph, I love how you have so many aspirations and I can see how much thought you have already put into what is needed to become a successful teacher in the future. I also have the same concern about not being able to meet the needs of every student I come across, but with support from colleges and building those relationships with students anything is possible! Like you have stated, when a student is interested in the information their level of engagement drastically increases, maybe add a reference to support your point here. It was great how you included the eight design principles, because they are so valuable. It would’ve been helpful to provide an example, or expand on some of the principles to show your understanding a bit more. In terms of the world we live in at the moment, I am also worried about every student receiving equitable access to technology or tools the student needs that will support learning remotely. As you pointed out, having flexible lesson plans is very important, so that changes can be made on the fly, so that all the needs to the students can be met! The two references that you discussed in your blog, are both great resources and show be explored further, keep them in mind for the future! 

EDCI 339

Blog Post #3

Prompt: Individual post #3: How can you ensure equitable access to authentic, meaningful & relevant learning environments for all learners in K-12 open and distributed learning contexts? What did you already know, what do you know now based on the course readings and activities, what do you hope to learn?

As a future educator, I am already aware of the challenges teachers and administrators face with the lack of funding. This makes it especially challenging to provide students with equitable access to resources, and it puts strain on the teacher to be able to provide a quality education out of their pocket. I know this is one of my biggest fears as a new teacher, having to put together a classroom from the ground up with little to no funds to do so. I plan to apply for different types of grants, through BCTF and other providers. The type of teacher I aspire to be, has a bunch of in class resources, as well as online access whenever students need or want to use an online tool. This also includes having different tools in the classroom to support each students learning. An audio station so that students can listen story as they follow along with the word is a must for me. Having an audio station is part of the Design Principle to include a space to practice oral and written language that is suggested by Kral & Schwab (2012.) I hope to teach primary, and I know how helpful this would be for all students and ones that are struggling. On top of that, including brain breaks using GoNoodle will be a daily occurrence in my classroom. 

GoNoodle video: Don’t Read Like a Robot – Blazer Fresh.

Having student choice and voice is extremely important to implement from a young age, because this is when they either become engaged in the learning process, or completely check out. Having meaningful and relevant material for students to learn concepts through is vital to student success. As a teacher, that means you need to have access to those resources and materials for any student that might show interest in a certain area.

Prior to this course, I had the opportunity to take four other technology related courses, so I feel like I had a bit of a jump start regarding what technology can look like in the K-12 classroom. Although I had some background knowledge, this course has been a steep learning curve for me. My knowledge on what the definition of open and distributed learning is, has completely changed. I believe that it shows my learning and growth throughout these short weeks focusing on that topic specifically. I am still unsure of what open learning would look like in a primary setting. I hope to develop some resources to implement that in the next few months, and that will also help me begin to design my classroom in the future. Alongside creating my own resources, I will stay in touch will fellow educators, via my PLN, to continue that conversation.

References:

Kral, I. & Schwab, R.G. (2012). Chapter 4: Design Principles for Indigenous Learning Spaces. Safe Learning Spaces. Youth, Literacy and New Media in Remote Indigenous Australia. ANU Press. http://doi.org/10.22459/LS.08.2012 Retrieved from:   http://press-files.anu.edu.au/downloads/press/p197731/pdf/ch041.pdf

(2020). Retrieved 19 July 2020, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xjtPMiumixA

EDCI 339

Digital Equity & Perspective: Pod Project Ariana Kelly, Alyssa Lloyd & Erin Fletcher

Part 1: Persona

We have created a persona chart for a student named Rory. The chart explains some of the barriers and needs of the student while also addressing the UDL guidelines in relation to online and open learning. https://docs.google.com/document/d/15LzVUq1JKVap3cn2LX-BYxSD_Z0I0Vzv-ORU8DrFeLQ/edit?ts=5f13487d

Part 2: Pitch

We have created a Youtube video pitch that highlights how Rory’s teachers would create a safe learning environment where Rory can be successful.

References:

Anisha Singh, A. (2017). 6 Ways To Improve Concentration For Students. Retrieved 15 July 2020, from https://www.ndtv.com/education/6-ways-to-improve-concentration-for-students-1720343

Basham, J.D., Blackorby, J., Stahl, S. & Zhang, L. (2018) Universal Design for Learning Because Students are (the) Variable. In R. Ferdig & K. Kennedy (Eds.), Handbook of research on K-12 online and blended learning (pp. 477-507). Pittsburgh, PA: Carnegie Mellon University ETC Press.

Equity is important matter for schools. (2017, March 11). Bismarck Tribune, The (ND), p. 8. Available from NewsBank: Access World News: https://infoweb-newsbank-com.ezproxy.library.uvic.ca/apps/news/document-view?p=AWNB&docref=news/1630C0E0829F7E58.

Garrett Dickers, A. (2018) Social Interaction in K-12 Online Learning. In R. Ferdig & K. Kennedy (Eds.), Handbook of research on K-12 online and blended learning (pp. 509-522 ). Pittsburgh, PA: Carnegie Mellon University ETC Press.

Hrastinski, S. (2020). Asynchronous and Synchronous E-Learning: A study of asynchronous and synchronous e-learning methods discovered that each supports different purposes [Ebook] (4th ed., pp. 51-55). EDUCAUSE Quarterly. Retrieved from http://sigproject.pbworks.com/f/sychronous+and+asychrouns+tools.pdf

Later works of john dewey, 1925-1953. volume 12: 1938, logic: The theory of inquiry. S.l.: s.n.

Let’s talk about the benefits of synchronous learning. (2020, May 26). Toronto Star [Toronto, Ontario], p. A17. Retrieved from https://link-gale-com.ezproxy.library.uvic.ca/apps/doc/A624881334/CPI?u=uvictoria&sid=CPI&xid=8e26fa72

METRO, N. S. (2014, Sep 03). Pros, cons of using the internet to complete homework. Wetaskiwin Times Advertiser Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.library.uvic.ca/docview/2172975124?accountid=14846

O’Byrne, W. (2013). The Four Types of Discussion Found Online. Where are you?. Retrieved 15 July 2020, from https://medium.com/@wiobyrne/the-four-types-of-discussion-found-online-where-are-you-3c559d409e71

Paradkar, S. (2019). Why teachers’ good intentions don’t matter when it comes to ‘equity’ in the classroom.

Regan, P., & Jesse, J. (2019). Ethical Challenges of edtech, big data and personalized learning: Twenty-first-century student sorting and tracking. Ethics and Information Technology, 21(3), 167-179. 

Roberts, V. , Blomgren, C. Ishmael, K. & Graham, L. (2018) Open Educational Practices in K-12 Online and Blended Learning Environments. In R. Ferdig & K.Kennedy (Eds.), Handbook of research on K-12 online and blended learning (pp. 527–544). Pittsburgh, PA: Carnegie Mellon University ETC Press.

Top education experts identify top 10 technology issues for classroom of future. (1995, September 1). Business Wire, p. 9011060. Retrieved from https://link-gale-com.ezproxy.library.uvic.ca/apps/doc/A17336473/ITBC?u=uvictoria&sid=ITBC&xid=6d63c068

UDL: The UDL Guidelines. Retrieved 15 July 2020, from http://udlguidelines.cast.org/Zhan, Z., & Mei, H. (2013). Academic self-concept and social presence in face-to-face and online learning: Perceptions and effects on students’ learning achievement and satisfaction across environments. Computers and Education, 69, 131-138.

EDCI 339

Week 3: Shelly Moore Book Club

In this video I explain why I chose this activity, the connection to the course and outside resources, as well as what I learned from completing the activity.

Shelly Moore’s instagram page, showing the bookclub series.

References:

Shelley Moore (@fivemooreminutes) • Instagram photos and videos. (2020). Retrieved 27 July 2020, from https://www.instagram.com/fivemooreminutes/channel/?hl=en

The 5MM Book Club. (2020). Retrieved 17 July 2020, from https://fivemooreminutes.com/5mm-book-club/

EDCI 339

Response to Ariana Kelly’s Blog Post #2

After reading over Ariana Kelly’s blog post #2: How would you describe the historical and theoretical trends in k-12 online and distributed learning? What did you already know, what do you know now based on the course readings and activities, what do you hope to learn? I had some reflections, ideas, and suggestions that I would like to share below.

I love the idea that educators have to stay up to date on the ever changing world around them. How are educators suppose to be able to engage students when they are out of touch with their interests and new technology? The diagram you used to show different learning mediums is very helpful to readers, because it clearly shows and supports the points you made in your blog. Thank you for bringing up the important point about how British Columbia has a different definition for learning spaces than other provinces or territories. Again, with support from the image you included it makes your learning and understanding clear. 

It is important to highlight how open learning practices would be implemented in a classroom, with the support of scaffolding on the teachers part. In your blog, you clearly laid out the steps in order to make this happen, and it is welcomed information for an aspiring teacher like me. Lastly, you touched on the 5 R’s, (reuse, revise, remix, redistribute, and retain) these are critical to know like the back of your hand as a teacher. Without knowledge of the 5 R’s, a teacher could get in trouble for not following the right steps when implementing online tools in their classroom. I believe you did a great job at mentioning this in your blog, and shining a positive light on the step by step process. Another great blog post! Thanks for sharing your valuable insights.

EDCI 339

Response to Erin Fletcher’s Blog Post #2

After reading over Erin Fletcher’s blog post #2: How would you describe the historical and theoretical trends in k-12 online and distributed learning? What did you already know, what do you know now based on the course readings and activities, what do you hope to learn? I had some reflections, ideas, and suggestions that I would like to share below.

I am excited to have the opportunity to read another one of your blog posts about open and distributed learning! I relate to your comment on how in elementary school technology was only used to learn how to type on computers in a computer lab. How times have changed! I love how you are leaning into the world now as we know it, technology everywhere. When students voices are heard, it enhances the learning of everyone involved. When you made the comment, “teachers must too be learners for life” it totally stuck with me. I wholeheartedly believe that teachers need to continue their learning and growth to foster that within their students, by setting an example. I was also baffled to learn that K-12 e-learning isn’t a new concept, dating back to the early 1900’s. In my mind, I felt like I grew up with the early stages of technology. The image you included that explains learning spaces is super helpful for the reader, and I loved how you included it in your blog. This post really shows how your learning has already evolved in this short time, and it is really exciting to see. Great work!

EDCI 339

Blog Post #2

Prompt: Individual blog post #2: How would you describe the historical and theoretical trends in k-12 online and distributed learning? What did you already know, what do you know now based on the course readings and activities, what do you hope to learn?

When thinking about the historical context of learning in k-12 schools in British Columbia, it makes me realize how far we’ve come, but on the other hand how not much has really changed either. Thinking back to a course I took that is directly related to the history of education, my biggest takeaway from that is that trends form within the field of education. By that I mean, things in education aren’t ‘new’ ideas, they are just reworked, because the pendulum swings one way and will inevitably come back. I can see this trend in online and distributed learning as well. I never realized that open learning went back so far, I felt like it had to be a new concept due to the influx in technology in the last 40 years, but I was wrong! Roberts, Blomgren, Ishmeal, and Graham state that the new definition for open learning is “Open learning became a term to describe flexible learning or asynchronous learning. Aspects of open learning formed the basis for distance or online learning” (Roberts, Blomgren, Ishmeal & Graham, 2018.) I found this very insightful, as to how broad open learning really is. 

I plan to investigate further into the history of open learning itself, because I still see ideas pop up that help strengthen the broad scope of education. I believe that moving into a open and distributed learning ideology is beneficial for teachers, students, and parents. Open and distributed learning is very flexible and fluid, which is especially helpful in times like these when covid-19 changes everything. It is also a benefit because students have choice and voice, so they become more engaged in the process of their own learning and take responsibility for it.  

This video created by Cathie Circosta does a great job at representing what open learning should and could look like in the classroom. It depicts what open learning is in less than three minutes.

References:

(2020). Retrieved 15 July 2020, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8an8-S5hBQ&feature=emb_title

Roberts, V. , Blomgren, C. Ishmael, K. & Graham, L. (2018) Open Educational Practices in K-12 Online and Blended Learning Environments. In R. Ferdig & K.Kennedy (Eds.), Handbook of research on K-12 online and blended learning (pp. 527–544). Pittsburgh, PA: Carnegie Mellon University ETC Press.